Gertrude Stein: A Nazi Collaborator

Max Eternity – Mark Karlin has penned a historical analysis about the renowned life and times of one of the 20th century’s most celebrated writers–Gertrude Stein–a Jewish lesbian who was, along with her brothers, a major patron and champion of modernist art and architecture.  Karlin’s piece leads in saying:

If you want to discover the real Gertrude Stein, two art exhibitions now making their way to Washington DC and Paris gloss over some shocking historic evidence.  Read more.

It’s not just Karin who’s talking about the complex and confusing life of Stein’s.  At Buzzflash, Bill Berkowitz provides evidence in an article entitled “Did You Know Gertrude Stein Allegedly Advocated Adolf Hitler for a Nobel Peace Prize? It Gets Worse” saying that Stein had led a campaign to nominate Adolph Hitler for a Nobel Prize.  Read more.

At Jweekley.com, an article by Sonia Melnikova-Raich entitled “Exhibit leaves out how Gertrude Stein survived Holocaust” explores Stein’s kiss with the Nazi’s as well.

Melnikova-Raich writes in part:

Many scholars have explored the subject. Their conclusions range from outright collaboration  (Barbara Will’s essay “Lost in Translation: Stein’s Vichy Collaboration”) to a more nuanced view of Stein’s possible simultaneous “familiarity with the Resistance” (Linda Wagner-Martin’s book “Favored Strangers”).

But most agree that Stein’s relationship with Faÿ and a certain degree of collaboration with the Vichy government during the war were a matter of choice.

Stein met Faÿ, a French history professor, in the late 1920s. Despite his open anti-Semitism, Faÿ declared his “adoration” for Stein and her writing, translated her books into French, and was instrumental in her becoming a celebrity in France and her 1934 American lecture tour, even teaching her lecturing techniques. (Stein’s “Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas” mentions Faÿ as a “charming guest” and “one of the four permanent friendships of Gertrude Stein’s life.”)  Read more.

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