Albert Einstein: A Social Justice Hero and Defender of Black Lives

The hefty contributions of Albert Einstein to the US civil rights movement are nothing short of legendary. Even before his arrival in the US from his native Germany, Einstein had already “backed a campaign to defend the Scottsboro Boys, nine Alabama teenagers who were falsely accused of rape in 1931.” And according to a 2015 article at Live Science, when “Princeton's Nassau Inn refused to rent a room to contralto opera star Marian Anderson” because she was Black, “Einstein invited the singer home as his guest.”

The Question: Brutality or Democracy?

In the first paragraph of a November 14th article at Der Spiegel, the author opens by saying “when Donald Trump is sworn in as the 45th president of the United States, the American Age will celebrate its 100th birthday—and its funeral.”

Rabbi Michael Lerner on Muhammad Ali, Israel, Palestine and Tikkun (pt. 3)

My hour long conversation concludes (Part 3) with Rabbi Michael Lerner— a renowned author, activist and humanitarian based in Berkeley, California—who along with Vaclav Havel and Noam Chomsky, Rabbi Lerner was chosen in 1998 by Utne Reader as one of the world's "100 top visionaries". And among other things, in 2005 Lerner received the Gandhi, King, Ikeda Community Builders Prize from Morehouse College, the alma mater of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.. Rabbi Lerner is also the founder of Tikkun Magazine, which celebrates its 30th anniversary this year.

NYC History: Trump, Slavery and the Implosion of Whiteness

According to the New York Historical Society, during colonial times 41 percent of New York City’s “households had slaves, compared to 6 percent in Philadelphia and 2 percent in Boston.” Too this, nearly “every businessman in 18th-century New York had a stake, at one time or another, in the traffic in human beings.” Donald Trump is from New York, and as Trump and White supremacy implodes in plain sight, remember that the current iteration of this multi-millennial, hellish and never-ending nightmare has its roots in New York City.

Rabbi Michael Lerner on Muhammad Ali, Israel, Palestine and Tikkun (Part Two)

In Part Two, my conversation continues with Rabbi Michael Lerner— a renowned author, activist and humanitarian based in Berkeley, California—who along with Vaclav Havel and Noam Chomsky, Rabbi Lerner was chosen in 1998 by Utne Reader as one of the world's "100 top visionaries". And among other things, in 2005 Lerner received the Gandhi, King, Ikeda Community Builders Prize from Morehouse College, the alma mater of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr..

Conversations: Ruth Erickson, Curator @ ICA Boston, Part Three

Earlier this year I conduced a feature podcast with Ruth Ericson, a curator at the Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA) about the epic Black Mountain College (BMC) exhibition she worked on under the direction of Helen Molesworth, who spearheaded the touring exhibition and presentation. In Part Three of our conversation Ericson and I first talk about pottery at BMC, and about Ruth Asawa’s prolific body of work created while at BMC. In conclusion, we talked about the African-Americans involved with BMC, including Jacob Lawrence.

To African-American Artists of a Certain Status: Where is Your Voice?

Until 1967 less than “a dozen museum exhibitions had featured the work of African American artists,” and though things have slowly gotten better for Black artists, it didn’t happen by magic. It happened because African-American artists were courageous enough to take to the streets and demand change! So I’m calling on African American Artists of a Certain Status to do the right thing and speak out forcefully against homelessness and the social acceptability of poverty, the ongoing [extrajudicial] killings of African-Americans, the school-to-prison pipeline, the slave-like conditions of the federal penitentiary and all other forms of “Jim Crow 2.0.”